Nonprofit Savannah focuses on sustainability and film sets

The old adage says that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. In this case, a man’s trash can is a filmmaker’s treasure. Film Biz Savannah collects items from film sets that end in the area and brings them to her warehouse for others to rent. The environmental nonprofit was established in New York in 2008 and handed over to current president Samita Wolfe in 2016. Wolfe opened the doors to Savannah on Earth Day in 2017. “It’s a kind of like a museum, but you can touch things,” Wolfe said. Before getting into acting, Wolfe went to Savannah State University for Environmental Science. “I wanted to do something in the area of ​​sustainability, so I figured that somehow, by bringing sustainability into the film industry, there was a need in Savannah where I wanted to come back. “said Wolfe. Future filmmakers at Savannah College of Art and Design spend hours. time at Film Biz Recycling. “They’re kind of our bread and butter most of the time. They come in super wide-eyed and have never been to a place like this. It’s really cool to see their brains working and understanding how they’re going to be able to complete their projects,” Wolfe said. Outside the warehouse, Wolfe has containers full of props she’s collected over the years. Inside, the warehouse is full anything you can imagine. “I like weird things. There’s a doctor who died who loved movies. His girls reached out to us and gave us a bunch of his stuff. Some of that stuff had his dentures, so I have his dentures. I have the correct doctor’s dentures,” Wolfe said. While running the nonprofit, Wolfe also worked as a set designer for films. If you want to check out Film Biz Recycling, click here.

The old adage says that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. In this case, a man’s trash can is a filmmaker’s treasure.

Film Biz Savannah collects items from film sets that end in the area and brings them to her warehouse for others to rent. The environmental nonprofit was established in New York City in 2008 and handed over to current president Samita Wolfe in 2016. Wolfe opened in Savannah on Earth Day 2017.

“It’s kind of like a museum, but you can touch things,” Wolfe said.

Before getting into acting, Wolfe went to Savannah State University for environmental science. “I wanted to do something in the area of ​​sustainability, so I figured that somehow, by bringing sustainability into the film industry, there was a need in Savannah where I wanted to. come back,” Wolfe said.

future filmmakers Savannah College of Art and Design spend endless time at Film Biz Recycling.

“They’re kind of our bread and butter most of the time. They come with super wide eyes and have never been in a place like this. It’s really cool to see their brains working and understanding how they are going to be able to carry out their plans,” said Wolfe.

Outside the warehouse, Wolfe has containers full of props she’s collected over the years. Inside, the warehouse is full of everything you can imagine.

“I like weird stuff. There’s a doctor who died who loved movies. His daughters reached out and gave us a bunch of his stuff. In some of that stuff was his dentures , so I’ve got his dentures. I’ve got the right doctor’s dentures,” Wolfe said.

While running the nonprofit, Wolfe also worked as a set designer for films.

If you want to check out Film Biz Recycling, click here.


Source link

Comments are closed.